Apple Hardware, iOS

Apple no longer has trust in Touch Id

It appears #Apple no longer has any trust in #TouchID. Mr. @tim_cook, I must admit when it was first released I was excited about the technology. I saw it as a solution to only having a short four digit pin as protection for my iPhone and iPad and it’s contents. So I began using a 26 digit passphrase for my security knowing i wouldn’t have to constantly type it in.

Boy was I wrong. With every update of iOS Apple has made it more difficult to continue using TouchId with a long passphrase. 

First, I had to type the pass phrase after every reboot. Apparently the safety focus groups believe in making you type while you are driving. Damn the statistics, they know better.  (Did they come from MS?) 

After another update, they made me enter my pass phrase after 48 hours of non- use. 

Now with iOS 9, they want my pass phrase after 48 hours of iPhone/iPad non-use or use.  So her I was trying to check my morning mail today, and it wants my pin. I was using my phone all day and evening yesterday. 

Of course, they have changed the pin length requirements to six digits. Wow, now that is more secure than a long pass phrase.

So what would you do?  Probably what I’ve done. Stop using a long pass phrase and go back to a pin.  Was that Apple’ intent all along?

Because I don’t want to keep re-entering a 26 digit pass phrase every two days, nor every time my phone acts up on the road and I have to reboot when driving. Which, honestly, does not happen often. But when it does, it sucks. 

I can live with the long pass phrases but the idea of having TouchId was to have trust of a biometric Id.  Does Apple no longer T R U S T.  It?

Cloud

Cloudy weekend in the Cloud

Saturday started as a beautiful fall day, until I tried to play some #Apple_Music. Nada, no music. Ok then tried to get some #Kindle eBooks. I was able to buy them but the downloads started and froze at zero bytes. After repeated attempts I gave up. 

Thought I’d go shopping on #Amazon. No deal there either, I was able to place my same day items in my cart, but order just would not go through. Spent an hour trying to get Amzon support. Call-back, their standard modus operandi was not available. Calling them got me a warning that I had a long wait, then “please call back later”. 

Anyone here about their DynamoDB troubles?  Can you figure out what that other white logo’d fruit shape may be hosted by them?  But I’m sure it was only a coincidence. 

iOS, Windows

A note to #Apple, #Microsoft, etc…

Dear @tim_cook and @satya_nadella:  just wanted to let you know how much of a turn-off it is towards your companies’ reputation, when you change application and/or system interfaces for the sake of someone’s un-bright idea.   This time my ire is with the iOS podcast app. I used to have a hierarchical view of my podcasts and could then drill in to each branch to see individual podcasts by date and status. iOS 9 changed that. I can now see the latest podcast of each branch and their status or the top level podcast branches but not the individual episodes, unless I stand on my head and whisper incantations. 

But, I’m sure this was voted on by a client focus group, like the one we, complainers are in. 

Ladies and gentlemen wake up. It is okay to add features, and change interfaces;  but do not presume to take functionality or views away. 

Apple Hardware, iOS

iPad Air 2, truly nothing but Air, @tim_cook

Well if that wasn’t a sleepy announcement I don’t know what would be. Excuse me while I nap…

So now we know how much Apple listens to their customers; as much as Microsoft. Way to go Tim. We’ be only been asking for a larger size iPad, the Pro for three years. We said we’d rather not have to lug around a hard keyboard if the soft keyboard was of full size and functionality. We said we wanted more memory. And OS X running under a windowed iOS and we said we wanted 256GB and 512GB flash options. We also asked to leave the form factor alone while increasing size and resolution. And more battery life.

Did Tim Cook et al take heed? Of course not, they’re too busy copying Microsoft’s frolicking.

So it appears the only one who had listened to our whispering was Steve Balmer. Well, just…

iOS, Operating Systems and Software

iOS 8 upgrades

Quick note, I upgraded our two iPhone 5’s (not S’s), two third gen. iPad’s and one retina mini iPad to iOS 8. The mini was the fastest, then the 5’s, and the iPad’s were very slow.

But the upgrade worked like a charm. For each device I closed all apps and rebooted it prior to the upgrade. Now if only our 6 pluses would get here; is it October 16th yet?

IT & IT Professionals

What’s wrong with SAAS and software subscriptions

Generally three things:

1. You may have to turn your data over to the cloud. They don’t keep it separate. Your bits and bytes are right next to everyone else’s bits and bytes. What would it take to expose your data to others and vice versa? That is a frontier yet to be explored.

2. You are are hostage to the software vendor’s update whims. They update when they want, what they want. You have no option to take an exclusion. Same with O365…

3. If an upgrade causes logical or interface changes to the apps you are used to, well just… T O U G H ! ! ! And if the upgrade or other circumstances break your process flow… T O U G H ! ! ! Check you SLA.

4. And for all of the companies who had backups in triplicate going back seven years? When they turn it over to a vendor they throw all of the backup and DR plans out the door, because they assume the vendor has them protected. Guess again.

I’m not saying these app delivery methods are bad, but think before signing on the bottom line. Don’t throw away the baby with the bath water.

A. Make sure you have a method in place to constantly replicate your data from the cloud to OnPremises, in a usable format, not an object format.

B. If they allow it, make sure you can get on premises copies of their cloud software versions, prior to upgrades, and that they are usable in case you have to roll back from their cloud to your own OnPrem copies.

C. Good luck!

IT & IT Professionals, Microsoft Hardware

Microsoft wonders why they don’t have geek loyalty…

Well, let’s count the ways they’ve burned the hands that feed them…

1. The #ribbon. We spoke loudly against it. We asked for a ribbon and a File/Edit menu alongside.

We were ignored.

2. MS killed Aces studio, makers of FlightSim.
We were flabbergasted the would kill one of the top geek products.

3. They gave us Vista.

We were at our wits end, that they wanted us to roll it out to users.

4. They gave us more ribbons.

We were astounded to find out the GUI customer forums had been replaced by… Yes men, err, MS managers.

5. Along the way They also killed Exchange public groups, I think they were called?

Hello? Have they heard of f.cebook, or worse, yammer?

6. Then they go kill off WME; I draw the line there, all my digitized images, music and movies are using WME encoding.

What is it that I’m supposed to use now? XBOX? That’s what they’re selling or spinning off right?

7. Let’s not forget the Labyrinth that is Windows 8? Which users did they talk with that convinced them we all want a single Windows OS for our PCs our tablets, phablets, phones, cars, and toilets? Sure it would have sounded beat, for a day maybe, then reality should have set in.

Perhaps that was the issue… Reality.

8. Finally they expect us to turn over our apps, and this is not only MS but other dynamic compute providers, for them to manage in the cloud.

We’re supposed to train the low payed minions they hire to manage and run all this, and then we’re supposed to slip quietly to welfare, or some cardboard boxes under some bridges

9. Fooled you, you thought I was finished, didn’t you? Then they kill off TechNet subscriptions.

Oh yeah I know the web site is still there. But have you run any searches lately that don’t bring back 90% Cloud responses? And where do they say we can see these grandiose systems they will be developing in the feature?

TechCloud, of course. And let’s not forget TechEd, or should I say CloudEd? Even the great propagandist, Mr Thurrott himself said there were slim pickings if you wanted anything but cloud.

10. Now finally they pissed off or on, same difference the vendors that were making hardware for MS software, and perhaps justifiably so.

But what does MS DO? They start making the same old cheap, low end crap they complained the vendors were making. Movie proportioned screens instead of paper proportioned; low resolution screens, short battery life; unimaginative and crappy software; oh, but they are trying to sell them at Apple price levels.

I also don’t know what they will do in the future, but I’ve spent thousands on WinCE devices whose OS may have lasted six months. But I couldn’t upgrade because they’d changed the hardware specs.

So dear Mr Nadella, (@satyanadella)?

Do you see why all of these hardware vendors, including Intel, are going with Chrome or Android?

Do you see why many companies moving to the cloud are doing so, but still managing their own data?

Do you see why us geeks are not likely to support you in the future?

And in all honestly, your office products aren’t innovative; they are weird and bloatware. As for server systems, the only thing not in the market elsewhere is Exchange.

But I’m sure MS will get around to that as we’ll.

Wow, I feel as if I need to spend some time in purgatory after that entire tirade.

The unfortunate part is that I really don’t have any answers. Except for split the OS GUI’s to their device parts, increase the hardware quality and drop the cost, and finally lose the darned ribbon.

Good night.